Friday, November 21, 2003

IHT: Meteor shards linked to massive extinction: "About three dozen microscopic shards of rock unearthed in Antarctica may be the fragments of a meteor that killed most of life on earth 250 million years ago, scientists reported Friday.

"The shards bolster theories that meteors caused several of the mass extinctions in earth's history when large numbers of species died out almost simultaneously. Most scientists agree that the most recent major mass extinction 65 million years ago, which killed off the dinosaurs, was caused when a meteor struck the earth near the Yucat√°n Peninsula of Mexico.

"The extinction 250 million years ago, known as the Permian-Triassic boundary, was the largest extinction of all. More than 90 percent of species living in the oceans and 70 percent of those on land disappeared.

"At present, the primary suspected cause for the Permian-Triassic extinction is giant volcanic eruptions in Siberia, which might have induced catastrophic ecological changes.

"Writing in Friday's issue of the journal Science, the researchers report that they found the meteorite fragments in rocks in Antarctica that date to the Permian-Triassic boundary. The mineral composition of the fragments, each less than one-fiftieth of an inch, or roughly half a millimeter, wide, correspond to that of certain meteorites and is like nothing found naturally on earth, they reported."

With a little tweaking, this would be an intriguing explanation of how God executed his flood of judgment on earth and wiped out most of life on earth. Just as the second and final judgment of earth will affect the entire cosmos, so perhaps the first judgment was as universal in its effects.

There is a growing school of thought in creation science that such astronomical activity is what triggered "all the fountains of the great deep" breaking up and other flood-related activity. Perhaps the asteroid belt is what's left of a planet that He blew up to bombard earth and the rest of the planets and moon in the solar system. Look at our moon! There's more.

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