Monday, July 9, 2018

Diet & Weight

When it comes to personal weight, there are three options: gaining, maintaining, and losing.

If you're young or an athelete, you may want to gain weight. The rest of us either want to lose weight or gain no more than we already have.

Some people think of eating healthy as being a way to lose weight. I don't. When I hear talk of eating healthy, to me that means maintaining weight.

It's certainly better than stress-eating which is a way to gain weight.

Losing weight is fundamentally about eating less. Why? Because you have to force your body to consume what it has already stored—the excess weight.

The fastest way to do that is to stop eating. It works, I promise.

For me, the best time to do this is in the morning. I'm one of those people that wake up hungry, so that's the most effective time for me to divert my body to itself for a source of energy. Drinking plenty of water also facilitates this process. I've burned two pounds a day this way before—no exercise required.

If a full-on fast is not an option, eating a few light carbs is useful to satisfy hunger distractions, but not so much that it stops the process of burning stored energy. Eating protein stops that process altogether.

In 2006, I took a big 5,000-mile road trip out west to visit some friends in Montana and family and friends in the Midwest. Long days in the car are great for not needing a lot to eat. After getting ribbed by some family about being heavy, I kicked into gear on eating less and not eating.

Something else I did when I got back was I forced myself to eat only food I already had available. Committing to eating food you're not as crazy about has a helpful way of slowing down your motivation to eat, too.

I don't remember all the numbers and the exact timing now, but for that trip and about three months afterwards, I lost about 10 pounds per month.

Summer 2018 is Round 2 of this technique, and it's producing similar results.

No comments:

Blog Archive

2013

You don't launch a popular blog,
you build one.
Seth Godin