Monday, May 11, 2020

The view from the dome of St. Peter's

From the dome of St. Peter's one can see every notable object in Rome, from the Castle of St. Angelo to the Coliseum.

He can discern the seven hills upon which Rome is built.

He can see the Tiber, and the locality of the bridge which Horatius kept “in the brave days of old” when Lars Porsena attempted to cross it with his invading host.

He can see the spot where the Horatii and the Curatii fought their famous battle.

He can see the broad green Campagna, stretching away toward the mountains, with its scattered arches and broken aqueducts of the olden time, so picturesque in their gray ruin, and so daintily festooned with vines.

He can see the Alban Mountains, the Appenines, the Sabine Hills, and the blue Mediterranean.

He can see a panorama that is varied, extensive, beautiful to the eye, and more illustrious in history than any other in Europe.
Source: The Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain

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